IBRAHIM ABABAKAR NJODI: A Systematic Bridge Builder. By Prof. Sola Fajana.

By Professor Sola FAJANA
Former Vice Chancellor, Joseph Ayo Babalola University, Ikeji Arakeji
Department of Employment Relations and Human Resource Management,
University of Lagos, Akoka, Yaba, Lagos-Nigeria.

“No man is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main…” John Donne (1572-1631)

Professor Ibrahim Abubakar Njodi and I spent a few years together as members of the Association of Vice Chancellors of Nigerian Universities (AVCNU). We however came into
closer contact in 2017 when he paid a visit to Professor T A Olowokure, a professor of Accounting serving at Joseph Ayo Babalola University (JABU), where I was the then Vice Chancellor. Professor Olowokure had worked meritoriously at the University of Maiduguri in
the 1980s, up to the level of Deputy Vice Chancellor, and was enjoying his retirement
through visible contributions to the growth and development of JABU from 2010 up to 2018
and beyond.

The action of Professor Njodi to visit JABU to see his former DVC was symbolic and worthy
of emulation. In some private sector organisations, notably in the Nigerian oil sector, a practice has emerged whereby retired staff are exposed to welfare packages that assured
employees of a pleasant retirement. This motivation strategy works positively not only for retired staff, but also serving employees.

With the assurance that post-work life will not be
characterised by trauma and poverty arising from a deceleration in the quality of life after retirement, current employees could concentrate on their jobs and leave the future into the hands of a caring employer. As a student of human resource management, this was the model that came to my mind on that beautiful day when Professor Njodi showed up at JABU to look
for Professor Olowokure, who in 2017 was already in his late 80s. I learnt quite a lot from that visit. I would mention just a few of the lessons.

No man is an island. No university can afford to be an island; and no vice chancellor as the
prime face of his university can afford to be an island. There must be networks and interconnecting bridges. Bridges must be built at interpersonal and organisational levels.
Universities as universal institutions must build bridges which could be future connectors to
fortunes with old students, current and old staff, high networth individuals, royalty, contacts and networks, local and abroad. It is evident that most of the achievements of Professor Njodi while in office as Vice Chancellor at University of Maiduguri are to be explained by his
adopted bridge-building strategies. Thus, we found building projects, hostels, roads, and kindred donations given to the University of Maiduguri because Professor Njodi did not absolve himself into an island, but systematically built and maintained critical bridges with significant stakeholders.

On 02 May 2019, I was privileged to give a public lecture at the University of Maiduguri. I accepted with utmost enthusiasm the invitation to give the lecture which was part of the
activities marking the successful completion of the vice chancellorship of Professor Njodi,.
This was an eager response to a very good turn which proverbially is said to deserve another.
If the VC had visited JABU, far back in 2017; then the least I could do was to maximise the
opportunity of the invitation to lecture, ignore the security challenges of the environment, and
return the visit of a good man, celebrate him and showcase him as a man of integrity whose pleasant lifestyle and productive bridge building could be recommended to other chief executives.

While some leaders get into exalted positions and remove the ladder (or bridge) that facilitated their advancement, so that others would be delayed or even denied, Professor
Njodi would always pursue, prosecute and promote the advancement of others in his role set. Staff, students and other members of the Unimaid community copiously testified to this
character of Professor Njodi. A vice chancellor who routinely engaged in dancing with his
staff and students at university functions, cannot but be awarded the title of most-student friendly vice chancellor, because he insisted on maintaining the bridge of friendship and
excellent human relations he had built with his students and staff. There are about four major trade unions in Nigerian universities. Staff unions in most progressive organisations, including universities, characteristically pursue the ideals of social
justice, equity, and fairness, as they struggle to achieve the best welfare dividends for their members. A method of building bridge with staff unions is for a chief executive to be
sensitive and responsive to the feelings and challenges of workers, follow the path of honour by being accountable with funds, prudent and judicious in spending, and obtaining value for money when public funds are being expended and for the purpose for which the funds were
collected in the first place. Professor Njodi did excellently well in all of these. I learnt reliably
that he recovered funds that would otherwise have been looted and applied same to create a structure that remained a historical landmark on the campus. Congratulations: that’s what great bridge builders do.
I took a guided tour of the campus upon my arrival on 01 May 2019. I noticed the serenity of the environment, the campus roads were well paved with asphalt, lighted with solar panels, aside from old buildings that had been renovated, and several new projects that were visible campus wide. But more importantly were the ongoing building of roads with construction
equipment visibly dotting major roads.

This time was the twilight of the tenure of the vice
chancellor, who had only a few more weeks in office. Again, I was persuaded that only a vice chancellor who believed unrepentantly in building bridges would do this. These last set of
projects may not even be credited to him. Nevertheless, he continues to spend quality
supervision time and energy to ensure that his successor would inherit a healthy institution. Memories of my visit to the University of Maiduguri in May 2019 would for a very long time
remain evergreen. If permitted, I shall make my testimony available to business schools
around the world as ‘a case study of a man whose life mission is to build bridges’.
I wish to congratulate Vice Chancellor Njodi for allowing himself to be used to do all of these things for humanity.I wish to congratulate even more the leadership of this institution, and the staff and the students for availing the vice chancellor a conducive and peaceful environment to do that which he was passionate about. Without the cooperation of the
community, it may have been very traumatic to accomplish so much, especially in a security
challenged environment. Congratulations to all.
I wish the legacies of teamwork, bridge building between town and gown, between units within the university; legacies of equity, fairness, justice,
accountability, prudence and resultbased management, generously released to the University of Maiduguri by Professor Njodi and his team, will subsist for sustainable development of the University.

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Gombe Governor Extols Sultan’s Virtues On 15th Anniversary.

Gombe State Governor, Muhammadu Inuwa Yahaya, has extoled the virtues of the Sultan of Sokoto, Muhammad Sa’ad Abubakar III, on his 15th anniversary on the throne, saying his reign as the spiritual leader of muslims in Nigeria has
brought about unprecedented peace among the people of all faiths in the country.

In a goodwill message to the royal father, the governor recalled what he described as the significant roles played by the Sultan in ensuring that the interest of Nigerians is taken care of and that the spirit of cooperation, communal living and peaceful co-existence is preserved.

He said, “On behalf of the government and good people of Gombe State, I congratulate and felicitate with our revered religious and traditional leader, His Eminence, Muhammad Sa’ad Abubakar III, the Sultan of Sokoto and President General of the Nigerian Supreme Council for Islamic Affairs
(NSCIA), on the occasion of his 15th anniversary since ascension to throne as the 20th Sultan of Sokoto.

“His reign as the spiritual leader of all Muslims in Nigeria has brought about unprecedented peace not only among the Muslim Ummah, but across Nigeria.

“As the custodian of culture and traditions, he has played significant role in ensuring that the interest of his subjects is taken care of and that the spirit of cooperation, communal living and peaceful co-existence is preserved.

“I will seize this opportunity to urge His Eminence to continue to help in fostering peace and harmony in order to help the nation and leaders in the effective discharge of their duties in government.

“We in Gombe State rejoice with His Eminence on this very auspicious day and wish that your peaceful reign will last throughout generations to come as you continue to provide us the much desired leadership we have seen in the last 15 years,” Governor Yahaya added.

Ismaila Uba Misilli
Director-General
( Press Affairs)
Government House
Gombe

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“Full text of key note address presented by Prof. Ibrahim Abubakar Njodi at the Annual Conference of the Faculty of Education Bayaro University Kano, titled “Understanding and Mitigating the Challenges of insecurity in Nigeria”.

Abstract
With the continued increase in armed criminality in Nigeria, poorly fortified public places such as schools are seen as “soft” and favourite targets of attacks by bandits, kidnappers, terrorists, militants, and other criminal groups. In recent times, direct attacks on schools by armed militants have resulted in the killing and abduction of hundreds of school children and teachers as well as the destruction of school buildings and learning materials.

With schools becoming increasingly vulnerable to insecurity, educating our children has become a serious challenge. The attendant effects of insecurity on the development of education in a country that is struggling to meet the Sustainable Development Goals targets on education are troubling. In this paper, I will make an attempt to briefly explore the phenomenon of insecurity in schools. Drawing from extant secondary sources of data, my analysis outlines the various dimensions and manifestations of security challenges facing Nigerian schools as well as the various approaches used in responding and coping with those challenges.

Finally, I used the current security challenge of banditry in the North-West and Boko Haram insurgency in the North-East as examples to highlight some of the impacts of lack of security in schools on educational outcomes in the country.

Introduction
The challenge of securing lives and property has been as old as human society. Throughout history, human communities have grappled with one security challenge or another, and only a few societies in history have been able to arrest all security threats and challenges. In both the developed and developing world, security challenges have remained top on the agenda of governments, civil society organisations and the people. In the developed world, even though economic development, effective political institutions, especially those responsible for policing and the administration of justice, have considerably succeeded in providing security and curtailing insecurity, threats of violent crimes continue to affect people in most countries.

The situation in the developing world is even worse. Throughout Asia, Latin America and Africa, insecurity has continued to claim thousands of lives annually. Governments of various countries appear helpless in dealing with multifarious violent crimes and other security challenges. For instance, in Nigeria, profound changes in the economic and social system have led to a bourgeoning crisis of insecurity that affects all nooks and corners of the country. Major among the ever-changing security challenges facing the Nigerian society include terrorism, armed robbery, kidnapping for ransom, rural banditry, political thuggery, cult violence, natural resource conflicts, ethno-religious conflicts, militant agitations and so on.

These different forms of security challenges not only pose a grave threat to Nigeria’s stability, unity and survival but also have huge human, economic and social consequences. One of these huge consequences is the disruption of social life through targeted attacks on public places such as schools, markets, places of worships etc. Considered as “soft targets”, poorly fortified public places such as schools have become favourite targets of attacks by militant groups, bandits, kidnappers and other criminals. In recent times, direct attacks on schools by armed militants have resulted in the killing and abduction of hundreds of school children and teachers as well as the destruction of school buildings and learning materials. With schools becoming increasingly vulnerable to insecurity, the education of our children has come under serious threat. The attendant effects of insecurity on the development of education in a country that is struggling to meet the Sustainable Development Goals targets on education are troubling. Available statistics (UNICEF 2021) have shown that there are currently over 10 million out of school children in the country, the majority of whom are in the north. As the UNICEF country representative, Peter Hawkins puts it:
“With increasing incidents of attacks on schools and kidnapping of students, the entire educational system in northern Nigeria is at serious risk if nothing is done urgently to put a halt to the attacks and abductions.” (UNICEF, 2021)
In this paper, I made an attempt to briefly explore the phenomenon of insecurity in schools. I will begin with a brief analysis of the relationships between security and human nature, before giving an outline of the dimensions and manifestations of security challenges facing Nigerian schools, the various approaches used in responding and coping with those challenges. Finally, I used the present crisis of rural banditry and Boko Haram insurgency as examples to highlight some of the many impacts of lack of security in schools especially on the effects educational development of the region and country.
Methods
The data used in this paper are drawn from official government records, newspaper reports and reports from surveys by development organisations in the country and academic publications. All data were obtained from open sources and verified to be credible. The analysis of extant data was conducted using content analysis procedures to extract evidence. All data were obtained from open sources and verified to be credible.
Security and human nature
To understand the phenomenon of insecurity as it affects schools and hamper the educational development of Nigeria, it is crucial to have a better understanding of the relationships between security and human nature. Historians have made efforts to investigate the historical origins of insecurity in human societies. From the various historical and archaeological accounts of humans, scholars have developed a consensus that threats to human life have been part and parcel of human life since the emergence of early hunting and gathering societies. The scale and nature of security threats have however changed for the worse with the rise of agricultural societies, characterised by competitions over territory, land and resources. In his attempt to explain the origins of modern nation-states, the British philosopher, Thomas Hobbes, famously opined that human life in primitive stateless societies was “solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short”. In this “state of nature”, Hobbes noted that lack of order, security and law entailed an endless “war of all against all”. Thus, to prevent/end the chaos and disorder, people came together to establish political entities called the nation-states in which sovereignty is given to political leaders in return for security and protection from harm and violation of rights by others (Hobbes, 1668). We can learn from this perspective, that the central idea behind the creation of social collectives such as the state and nations, as we know them today, is the need to ensure security for all. Even though, early nation-states were conceived with the intention of providing security for its members, scholars differ on the extent to which this important objective has been met by pre-modern states. What is clear, however, is that the industrial revolution and the rise of modern nation states, has brought new kinds of security challenges that seem to defy policy solutions.
It is therefore not surprising that cross-national studies on people’s perspectives on security have found that physical insecurity is the most important concern of people in many countries, especially in the developing world (World Bank 2000). In defining security, people who participated in the World Bank study identified stability, predictability and continuity in their lives as the priority to them.
Dimensions and manifestations of insecurity in schools
Schools in virtually all geopolitical zones in Nigeria are facing diverse forms of security challenges. The effects of these different kinds of security issues faced by schools on education and development in the country is also manifesting in many different ways. Hence, the strategies parents’, students and teachers use in adapting and coping with them are also multifaceted. Below are some of the different dimensions of security challenges affecting schools in Nigeria:
Armed insurgency/terrorism
This is perhaps the biggest and most serious security challenge affecting schools in the North-Eastern part of the country. The brutal insurgency waged by Boko Haram terrorists in the region has caused severe damage to education, especially in Borno, Yobe and Adamawa State. According to the Federal Government of Nigeria, the war has led to the destruction of over 1,500 schools and the death of about 2,295 and displacement of 19,000 teachers (Punch News, 2018) in those states. In addition, the terrorist groups have abducted hundreds of school children, notable among which are the over 200 school girls who were abducted in Chibok, Borno State, in 2014 and the 110 Dapchi girls who were abducted in 2018. Boko Haram’s violent campaign against Western education since 2009 has targeted schools with the sole aim of discouraging people from sending their children to school.
Kidnapping and banditry
Another major security issue that is bedevilling Nigeria and is gradually affecting schools is the phenomenon of kidnapping for ransom or for ritual killings. Schools in different parts of the country are gradually becoming susceptible targets in this growing security threat. Recently, criminal elements, particularly rural bandits in the North-west, have developed interest in kidnapping school children whom they held hostage in order to demand ransom payments before freeing their victims.
According to a statement issued by the Country Representative of the United Nations Children Fund, “no fewer than one million students across the country would miss school this year due to fear of abduction and attacks” (Punch News, 2021b). The UN agency’s statement also revealed that no fewer about 1,436 students were so far abducted this year, 16 of whom were killed by bandits in about 20 different attacks.
In other cases, kidnaps of vulnerable school children were motivated by ritual killings or the trade of human parts for rituals. In most cases, victims of this heinous crime suffer from sexual abuse, physical and psychological torture in the hands of their captors. Children survivors of kidnapping are likely to suffer from acute Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, which is associated with depression, anxiety and mental retardation. Such a negative condition affects their future education and life in general.
Cult violence and gangsterism
Like terrorism, rising cult violence is another security issue affecting Nigerian schools. Although cultism and cult violence are more common in Nigeria’s tertiary institutions, there is a recent surge in cultist activities in secondary schools in some parts of the country. Where cult groups operate, members form rival fraternities that fight for supremacy. Their rivalries usually turn violent, leading to killing and maiming of students and destruction of school property. Youngsters in secondary schools are usually attracted to cult groups due to, among other things, peer pressure, the need for protection from bullies as well as to revenge previous grievances. A recent example is the clash between rival cult groups in Government Secondary School, Karu near the FCT (Bejamin, 2018).
Closely related to the security issue of cultism is gangsterism and, like cultism, this is another major security challenge associated with secondary schools in different parts of the country. In towns and villages where gangsterism is commonplace, teenage school children are easily brainwashed to join gangs of criminals from outside or within their schools with the intent of carrying out criminal activities and armed violence.
Students’ riots
Students’ unrest and riots is one of the oldest security challenges in the Nigerian educational institutions. Some riots usually start as normal protests and demonstrations against living and/or learning conditions in schools or perceived maltreatment of colleagues by school authorities or fellow students. In some cases, the protests are triggered by factors and events from outside. Such protests, if uncontrolled, often turn violent when students go on rampage, destroying properties and causing physical harm to people.
Bullying and sexual molestation of students
Bullying of junior students by senior students, sexual harassment of students by their older colleagues are security issues that continue to affect education in most countries around the world. Sexual harassment of students, especially girls, by teachers and outsiders is also becoming widespread in Nigeria secondary schools nowadays. Student who become victims of bully usually experience erosion of their school engagement, as they find themselves alienated from their teachers and peers. Their overall academic achievement because severely affected (Gruber & Fineran, 2015).
Theft and robbery
Theft of students’ and teachers’ belongings in schools is a common security problem in Nigeria. In some places, robbers armed with dangerous weapons storm schools from the local communities to molest and disposes members of the school community of their personal belongings, often causing physical injuries to their victims. Poor security infrastructure and arrangement in most public schools is contributing to the increasing menace of theft and robbery in our schools.
Drugs and substance abuse
There is also a growing prevalence of drugs and substance abuse among students of secondary schools in Nigeria. Drug abuse by students has become a major source of confrontation between students and school authorities and between groups of students. It is also seen as a major contributing factor to other security challenges such as stealing, rape, gangsterism, cultism and so on. Illegal abuse of drugs and substances by teenagers in schools has been implicated in the high rates of school dropouts, poor academic performance and future indulgence in criminality (Ojukwu, 2017).
Impacts
How is insecurity affecting education generally?
Fear among students, parents and educators and others: Even in countries were incidents of targeted violence in schools are not many, they tend to have tremendous impacts on the schools attacked, the surrounding communities, the country as a whole, if not the world at large (United States Secret Service, 2004).
Apathy towards education: Rise in school dropouts and reduction in school enrolment.
Apathy towards the teaching profession: The teaching profession used to be seen as one characterised by less occupational hazards and stress. However, with the growing security problems affecting schools in many parts of the country, the occupational risks of the teaching job are beginning to receive attention. The Boko Haram insurgency that has ravaged communities in the North Eastern region is an example of how insecurity has dealt a big blow on the teaching profession. For instance, the terror group has caused the death of an estimated number of 2,295 teachers, while over 19,000 have been displaced (Punch News, 2018). Apart from direct attack on teachers, another feature of the insurgency is destruction of schools and educational infrastructure. According to some estimates, more than 1,500 schools have been destroyed. With schools destroyed, teachers and students in the affected communities have been rendered redundant at their homes or in their place of refuge. In a region that has been suffering from educational backwardness, this no doubt is a terrible blow to educational development. A major ramification of the impact of the insurgency is that qualified teachers and people who have the potentials to qualify as teachers become increasingly terrified and less enthusiastic about continuing or pursuing careers in education.
Approaches to mitigating insecurity in schools
The diverse security issues outlined above are being responded to using different measures and approaches. Some of the most commonly used strategies for securing schools include:
Fencing: Schools fencing has been a classical strategy of securing schools from intrusions and attacks. With the changing nature of violent crimes, this age-old measure has proven less effective in preventing heavily armed bandits and terrorists from targeting schools.
Policing and patrolling: Beeping up security in schools located in violent affected communities is a common measure. This measure is not limited to deploying armed police and military men to schools, state governments in the north have resorted to hiring hunters and vigilantes to guard schools (Punch News, 2021b).
Security and safety education: Providing students and educators with public safety information that may help them be able to prevent targeted violence on schools
Risk assessment, threats audits and targeted attacks prevention identified by the US Secret Service and the Department of Education (United States Secret Service, 2004) as the most promising strategy for preventing schools attacks.
Creation of School Emergency Response Teams: Prompt law enforcement response
Community interventions to protect schools
School closure (mostly temporary): Security breaches in schools are usually followed by abrupt closure of schools in affected communities. This measure tends to have tremendous far-reaching impacts on educational development as is being seen in Nigeria.
The Safe Schools Initiative
Launched in May 2014 after the abduction of 276 schoolgirls from their school in Chibok, Borno State, the Safe School Initiative (2014-2018) aimed to move students in the highest risk areas to schools in safer parts of the country. The initiative also sought to provide learning materials to school children and rebuilding of schools with extra security measures. But according to a statement credited to the Minister of Education, Adamu Adamu, the implementation of the initiative was being hampered by lack of funds and logistics (Punch News, 2021a).
What is worth noting is that there is no magic bullet, or one-size-fits-all solution to all these security challenges affecting schools in this country. The security measure or a set of measures adopted will depend on the security threat to be confronted, the local context/situation, as well as time and other factors. For this reason, customised risk and threats assessment of schools and crime prevalent in various locations is necessary to developing templates for rapid response strategies and preventive measures.

Solutions?
How can educators, law enforcement, parents and members of violence-affected communities develop their own thinking on security and insecurity in schools?
Again, no one-size-fits-all solution. Each security threat requires context-specific measures to be prevented. However, a combination of following measures have been identified from the review of available evidence on schools attacks across the world:
Risk assessment and threat audits
Schools and local community security initiatives and collaboration
Students’ security and safety education
Creation and coordination of rapid response and risk mitigation.

Conclusion
From the above discussion, we have seen how insecurity is causing serious disruptions to education in general and the teaching profession in particular. It is clear from the brief analysis that security issues facing schools in this country are multifarious, complex and protracted. The problems are also largely a direct consequence of structural problems and dysfunctions in the Nigerian society. As ‘open systems’, schools have become one of the institutions of the Nigeria society that are deeply affected by the rising security challenges facing the larger society. However, there are steps that can be taken to minimize incidental breach of security in schools and reduce their negative impacts on members of school communities. Rather than providing direct guidelines on how they can do that, I hope this paper will stimulate discussions on practical approaches to coping with and addressing the challenges of insecurity in schools.

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BUK: Prof Njodi Calls for Collaborative efforts to address growing Security threat to Schools.

The Secretary to Gombe State Government Professor Ibrahim Abubakar Njodi has called for an effective Collaboration among critical stakeholders in the Education sector to address growing Security threat to institutions of learning in the country.

In a key note address titled ” Understanding and Mitigating the Challenge of insecurity in Nigeria” at the Annual National Conference of the Faculty of Education Bayaro University Kano ( BUK), Professor Ibrahim Abubakar Njodi a former Vice Chancellor University of Maiduguri expressed concern over the negative consequences of insecurity to Educational Development in the Country.

Represented by the Director of Research and Documentation Government House Gombe, Dr Mu’azu Shehu, the former Vice Chancellor noted that records have shown that attacks by insurgents on Schools in Yobe, Borno and Adamawa has led to destruction of over 1500 Schools and the death of about 2,295 Students and displacement of 19,000 teachers.

Professor Njodi also disclosed that the Dimensions of insecurity includes, Boko Haram, insurgency, Kidnapping for Ransom, Banditry, Cultism, Drugs and Substance abuse have increasingly become a serious threat to Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Educational Institutions in the Country.

While noting that each Security threat requires Context- Specific measures to be prevented or controlled, Professor Njodi suggested Combination of risk assessment and threats, to Schools and Local Community Security initatives, and creation of Coordination of rapid response risk mitigation efforts.

In his address Kano State Governor, Dr Abdullahi Umar Ganduje express delight through which the keynote speakers explored the numerous security challenges facing the Education Sector and the workable solutions they proffer.

The Conference which attracted People from the Academia was graced by Governor Umar Ganduje and his Wife, Dr Sadiya Umar Ganduje amongst other dignitaries.

Joshua Danmalam
Information Officer SSGs office.
1/11/21

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BUK: Prof Njodi Calls for Collaborative efforts to address growing Security threat to Schools.

The Secretary to Gombe State Government Professor Ibrahim Abubakar Njodi has called for an effective Collaboration among critical stakeholders in the Education sector to address growing Security threat to institutions of learning in the country.

In a key note address titled ” Understanding and Mitigating the Challenge of insecurity in Nigeria” at the Annual National Conference of the Faculty of Education Bayaro University Kano ( BUK), Professor Ibrahim Abubakar Njodi a former Vice Chancellor University of Maiduguri expressed concern over the negative consequences of insecurity to Educational Development in the Country.

Represented by the Director of Research and Documentation Government House Gombe, Dr Mu’azu Shehu, the former Vice Chancellor noted that records have shown that attacks by insurgents on Schools in Yobe, Borno and Adamawa has led to destruction of over 1500 Schools and the death of about 2,295 Students and displacement of 19,000 teachers.

Professor Njodi also disclosed that the Dimensions of insecurity includes, Boko Haram, insurgency, Kidnapping for Ransom, Banditry, Cultism, Drugs and Substance abuse have increasingly become a serious threat to Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Educational Institutions in the Country.

While noting that each Security threat requires Context- Specific measures to be prevented or controlled, Professor Njodi suggested Combination of risk assessment and threats, to Schools and Local Community Security initatives, and creation of Coordination of rapid response risk mitigation efforts.

In his address Kano State Governor, Dr Abdullahi Umar Ganduje express delight through which the keynote speakers explored the numerous security challenges facing the Education Sector and the workable solutions they proffer.

The Conference which attracted People from the Academia was graced by Governor Umar Ganduje and his Wife, Dr Sadiya Umar Ganduje amongst other dignitaries.

Joshua Danmalam
Information Officer SSGs office.
1/11/21

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New yam festival: Gombe Igbos honours Prof. Njodi with “Ikemba Ndi Igbo”

…..As Governor Inuwa harps on unity, peaceful Co-existence.

The Igbo community in Gombe State have conferred on the Secretary to the Gombe State Government Professor Ibrahim Abubakar Njodi with the traditional title of IKEMBA NDI IGBO.

The conferment ceremony coincided with the celebration of the New yam festival by the Igbo community in Gombe State Saturday.

Speaking shortly after been decorated with the traditional regalia of “IKEMBA NDI IGBO”, the Secretary to the Gombe State Government Professor Ibrahim Abubakar Njodi express gratitude to the Igbo community in the State for honouring him with the traditional title.

“I can assure all the Igbos and other citizens of Nigeria that, this conferment to me is a precipice of what Nigeria promise to do for all of us, we must remain united regardless of our ethno religious affiliations.

The SSG remarked that inspite of the social economic and political challenges confronting the Country, Nigerians irrespective of their geopolitical zone must profer workable solutions through dialogue rather than engaging in agitations that can bring the country down.

Professor Njodi call on Nigerians to unite and see each other as brothers and sisters as Nigerian is better and stronger together.

“Having received this title i promise you, i don’t have somebody different as far as I am concern Igbo man is the same thing as the Tangale man from where i came from, as far as i am concern the Igbo man is the same thing as the Gombe man and a Yoruba man I don’t see any difference in this and this is what i will be propagating with this title you have given me”.

The conferment of the traditional title of IKEMBA NDI IGBO by the Igbo Community in Gombe State comes less than five months after the Igwe of Igbo Community in the State confered on the SSG the traditional title of NWANNE-DINAMBA.

Governor Muhammadu Inuwa Yahaya who was represented at the event by the State Deputy Governor Dr. Manasseh Daniel Jatau congratulated the Igbo community in Gombe State for celebrating the New Yam Festival.

The Governor equally congratulated recipients of various traditional titles at the event among them the SSG, Professor Ibrahim Abubakar Njodi, Chief of staff Government House Abubakar Inuwa Kari Commissioner of works and transport Abubakar Bappah, Hon. Asama’u Iganus, the Director Protocol Musa Bushasha the Chairman Gombe Local Government Area Aliyu Usman Haruna and the Commander 301 Artillery Regiment Colonel J.C Mbanefo among others.

Governor Inuwa Yahaya maintain that the conferment of traditional titles to Gombe indigenes and key figures in his administration signifies unity in diversity.

He said his administration will continue to make Gombe State home to all law abiding Nigerians irrespective of ethnic or religious affiliations.

Joshua Danmalam
Information Officer SSGs office
30/10/21

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Security Council Meeting: Gombe Government Bans Migrating Herders Into The State.

… Urges Farmers To Harvest Produce On Time To Prevent Disputes

Gombe State Government is taking necessary measures to avert farmer-herder clash in the state, as farners prepare to hervest their produce.

To this end, the government has restricted migrating herders from coming into the State until the end of January 2022 when farmers in the State must have completed their harvest. 

This was among other resolutions reached at an expanded State security council meeting chaired by Governor Muhammadu Inuwa Yahaya at the Government House.

Briefing newsmen on the outcome of the meeting, the Commissioner of Information and Culture, Julius Ishaya Lapes said the council equally advised farmers to harvest their farm produce on the appropriate time and also cautioned them to avoid burning the remnants on their farmlands after  harvest to enable cattle rearers feed their animals.

He explained that the meeting further put a stop to herding activities by under aged and equally restricted grazing activities from the hours of 6pm to 6am.

The Commissioner of Information and Culture said the expanded state security council meeting also reviewed the earlier imposed 10pm-5am movements restrictions within and outside the State as a result of covid-19 pandemic to 12 midnight-5am.

He said security of the State and the discouragement of night travels were chiefly behind reasons for the review and appealed to Security Agencies to ensure full compliance with the new State government directive.

Mr. Julius Lepez, told the media gathering that in conjunction with the motorcycles riders association,  Commercial tricycle and relevant Unions, the State government has advised its members to register their fleets on or before October 31st, 2021 as security Agencies have been directed to sanction any defaulters of the deadline.

He said that the state government had, earlier in the year, set up a committee to fine-tune ways of ensuring that there was no clash between farmers and herders in the state.

All these measures, he said, were to avoid any form of conflicts and protect the harvest for the present cropping season, “knowing full well that the season has not been good in some parts of the country.

“So the little we have cultivated, we should be able to protect them so we don’t find ourselves in food crisis,” he said.

The expanded security council meeting held at the Council’s chamber of the Gombe government House was attended by relevant cabinet members of the state government, heads of security Agencies, selected traditional and community leaders.

Ismaila Uba Misilli
Director- General
( Press Affairs)
Government House
Gombe

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New Revenue Formula: Gombe Governor Canvasses 60% for States, LGs.

…Demands Special Consideration For Gombe State In View of Its Peculiar Location, Role In North East

Gombe State Governor, Muhammadu Inuwa Yahaya has described the ongoing process for the review of the revenue allocation formula as an avenue to
review the challenges of economic development and issues confronting revenue generation.

The Governor stated this while declaring open, the Nirth East zonal public hearing on the review of revenue allocation formula organized by the Revenue Mobilization Allocation and Fiscal Commission (RMAFC) in Gombe.

The governor said the review becomes imparative in order to make it in tune with the principles of equity and fairness.

“While details of the Gombe State’s Position will be delivered during the presentation session, let me make it clear that a review of the revenue formula to a more people centric, equitable and fairer allocation formula where the Federal Government gets 40%, the States 35% and the LGAs 25% is the consensus view of the people and is therefore proposed to the RMAFC”.

Governor Inuwa Yahaya described the occasion as unique as it will provide participants the opportunity to meet and interact with personalities, whose wealth of experiences will come to bear on the workshop.

“The Public Hearing on Review of Revenue Allocation Formula is indeed apt and timely as it will enable us to review the challenges of economic development and serve as an avenue for diagnostic review of issues confronting revenue generation. This is paramount in view of the glaring global economic realities which indicate that meaningful economic growth and development are not fully attainable in a monolithic economy like ours”.

“I understand that this zonal public hearing is amongst the series being organized by RMFC aimed at sensitizing the three tiers of Governments on the Review of Revenue Alloction Formula base on the revenue generation of the nation to sustain economic growth, create job opportunities and provide infrastructural facilities”.

He reminded participants at the public hearing that the promulgation of the Fiscal Responsibility Law in 2012 was aimed at ensuring fiscal discipline through collection, remittance and disbursement of funds.

The Governor said the era of generating revenue and spending it on the premise of an existing law, order or procurement is no longer acceptable as all expenditures must be appropriately handled.

He however regretted that despite the massive natural and human resource endowments, the Nigeria continues to depend on crude oil resources as the major source of revenue for decades despite the massive developmental challenges facing it.

“This leaves us with no alternative than to diversify the economy, especially with the current trends of globalization and the monumental challenges facing us as a nation. We must therefore harness our resources wisely to turn the destiny of our country around by utilizing the existing abundant potentials inherent in the economy”.

The Governor noted that diversification of the economy is the only panacea for the socio-economic development of the country, as the nation can maximally harness and utilize the abundant natural resources bestowed on her by the Almighty Allah to rebuild the economy, and improve the living standards of the people.

“It is against this backdrop that at the inception of this administration we wasted no time in constituting a Committee to address infrastructural gaps and improve the economy of the State. An IGR Committee was also set up to improve our revenue by blocking leakages and enforcing mechanism that would provide a rewarding system to attain set targets”.

He said on revenue generation, the State had passed a Fiscal Responsibility Bill to block all leakages in revenue collection and enhance prudence and transparency in its financial transactions.

“In addition to PAYE usually deducted from source, efforts have been intensified to ensure that businessmen and corporate organizations pay their correctly assessed taxes to the Government as at when due”.

He explained that the significant achievements recorded by the State is monumental where in Government has made unprecedented efforts through the provision of massive socio-economic infrastructure, overhauling of the educational sector, transformation of the Agricultural Sector, improvement of the health sector, creating employment opportunities for the teeming youths and women, protection of lives and properties among other areas of human interests.

“However, this can only be achieved through patriotism, discipline, transparency in governance, attitudinal change and, above all, the fear of God”.

Governor Inuwa Yahaya further noted that:
“Gombe State is among the bottom States in terms of Federal Allocation. The fact that we are able to achieve far more than even the richest States attest to our remarkable level of financial efficiency and prudence. But given the special position of Gombe State at the center of the North-east, we serve as the regional shock-absorber, witnessing the influx of internally displaced persons from frontline insurgency States of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe. This puts tremendous pressure on our basic infrastructure and services. It is therefore only fair that the special consideration being extended to these 3 States be also extended to Gombe State to enable us deal with new challenges”.

The Governor called on the participants in attendance of the Public Hearing to take time off their tight schedules and go round to see the developmental efforts taking place in the State.

” I wish to urge resource persons and participants to discuss the issues at stake dispassionately in order to chart a way forward towards achieving the noble objectives of this Workshop”.

The chairman Revenue Mobilization Allocation and Fiscal Commission, RMAFC Engr Elias Mbam said the zonal public hearing is aimed at reviewing the current revenue allocation formula to meet with current economic realities.

He said the periodic review is usually moderated by the Revenue Mobilization Allocation and Fiscal Commission, RMAFC to harvest proposals across the country on how to tinker with the revenue sharing formula through the approval of the National Assembly.

He stated that the commission is committed to ensuring that the new revenue allocation formula captured the yearnings and developmental aspirations of Nigerians.

”The commission conducted similar exercises in other five geo-political zones of the country in order to obtain relevant data from relevant agencies for use in the review process.

“The wider engagement of stakeholders in the process of data gathering was to ensure an all-encompassing and inclusive process,” he said.

He said that studies on fiscal matters relating to allocation of federation revenues were also being carried out, adding that the processes were aimed at ensuring that the new revenue formula would be “fair, just and equitable.”

He expressed confidence that the participation and contributions in the public hearing would enrich the outcome and assist the commission in coming up with a revenue formula that would be acceptable to majority of Nigerians.

Engr Elias Mbam thanked Governor Muhammadu Inuwa Yahaya for accepting to host the Zonal Public hearing, describing the gesture as most welcoming.

Earlier in an address of welcome, the Secretary to the Gombe State Government, Professor Ibrahim Abubakar Njodi tasked delegates from the North East sub-region to come up with a united position that could help fast track development in the insurgency stricken zone.

Ismaila Uba Misilli
Director- General
( Press Affairs)
Government House
Gombe

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Gombe Governor expresses satisfaction with Federal Government social Intervention Programmes.

Gombe State Governor Muhammadu Inuwa Yahaya has pledge administration’s commitment to supporting all projects initiated by the Federal Government aimed at Fighting Poverty and Unemployment among Nigerians.

Governor Yahaya made the commitment at the official hand over 5,000 feeding Utensils for the Home Grown School Feeding Programme by the Ministry of Humanitarian Affairs, Disaster Management and Social investment held at Hassan Central Primary School Gombe.

Represented by the Secretary to the State Government (SSG) Professor Ibrahim Abubakar Njodi, Governor Yahaya noted that, the APC led Federal Government has taken practicable measures to ensure social protection and Poverty alleviation strategies which seeks to raise School enrollment, School nutrition and boost local economic activities across the Communities in the Country.

The Governor Commended President Muhammadu Buhari, the Minister of Humanitarian Affairs, Disaster Management and Social investment and the National Co-ordinator for working tirelessly towards actualizing the lofty initiatives to free the People from object Poverty and literacy.

He assured that the State Government will do everything humanly possible to ensure that the challenges facing the successful implementation of the programme in the State are identified and addressed.

The representative of the Minister of Humanitarian Affairs, Disaster Management and Social investment who doubles as the National Co-ordinator Social investment Programme, Dr Umar Buba Bindir said the National Home Grown School Feeding Programme is one of the Federal Government initiatives aimed at improving literacy among the populace.

He explained that the School Feeding Programme is mainly designed to address Poverty through Collaboration between the State and the Federal Government.

Dr ,Bindir said the Federal Government has since the inception of the program, over 1,234 Schools enrolled, with 228,046 Children being feed using the service of 3073 Cooks.

Bindir also disclosed that, total investment of the Federal Government on all these sectors amount to N 320, 104,400 monthly, stating that on the entire National Home Grown School Feeding, the sum of 4.5 billion Naira has been expended in the state.

In her remarks, the State Focal Person of the Programme and Special Advisers on Social investment Hajiya Dijatu Bappa appreciated the Federal Government for the Programme which she said has greatly improved School enrollment in the the State in addition to enhancing the economic wellbeing of the Pupils and the Food Vendors.

Similarly the Governor has urged Participants at a four day skills and enterprenuership development training for mobile Money Agents North East holding at the Gombe State University, to remain focus while the training lasted.

Represented by the SSG Professor Ibrahim Abubakar Njodi said the Programme which is aimed at improving the Financial inclusion was an initiatives of the Federal Government to create employment for the teeming Youths in the Country.

He said it was the desire of President Muhammadu Buhari to bequeath a Nigeria where it working population will gainfully employed thereby reducing poverty in the State.

The representative of the Minister of Humanitarian Affairs, Disaster Management and Social investment and Co-ordinator of the Programme Dr, Umar Bindir said the Programme is expected to trained and registered and supported with stater packs and N20,000 to operate mobile services in their respective Communities.

Joshua Danmalam
Information Officer SSGs office.
27/10/21

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“Remain Resolute In Dealing With Emerging Security Threats”, Governor Inuwa Tells Nigerian Army, Other Security Agencies.

Gombe State Governor, Muhammadu Inuwa Yahaya has charged the Nigerian Army and other security agencies in the country to remain resolute, focused and determined in dealing with emerging security challenges confronting the nation.

The Governor gave the charge while speaking as Special Guest of Honour at the 3 Division Operations Planning Cadre of the 301 Artillery Regiment, General Support held at the Gombe International Hotel.

The Operations Planning Cadre is designed to equip junior and middle cadre of the Nigerian Army with the requisite knowledge on techniques and procedures in the planning and conduct of military operations.

This was why Governor Inuwa Yahaya described the fundamentals of the operations planning cadre taking place in the State as apt, especially coming at a time when his administration is equally living no stone unturned to ensure the peace and tranquility of the State.

The Governor singled out the 301 Artillery Regiment Gombe for special commendation, describing its continuous cooperation with the state government, as largely responsible for the relative peace the State is currently enjoying.

“I want to also thank the other security agencies, particularly the DSS and the Nigerian Police for working with us and in addition, I believe within the north east, no other State created a specific Ministry to be incharge of internal security except Gombe”.

Governor Inuwa Yahaya stressed that in order to tap from the experiences of veterans, his administration appointed retired Army Colonel, Police Commissioner and State Director of Security as Special Advisers on security matters and other related issues.

“We all know that without security no aspect of development will ever take place and for sure these crop of people have been working day and night to provide peace, security harmony and to provide the leadership required in order for Gombe to attain this feat, so we thank each and every one of you for contributing towards peace on which we are able to catapult Gombe to get to its current level”.

But Governor Inuwa Yahaya however sounded a note of caution to the Nigerian Army and other security agencies on the precarious nature of Gombe State given its geographical location at the centre of the North East.

“It is the design of the Almighty that we share boundaries with all the states in the North East so whatever happens to any of those states dovetails to Gombe”.

He maintained that there are evidence suggesting that because of the relative peace and tranquility Gombe enjoys, the State is becoming a transit camp for criminals to either acquire illicit materials or use as a safe haven for planning of criminal activities.

“The peace should not deceive us to rest until we make sure that we protect the people and give them the environment on which no threat will come in so that they can move forward; the Army can do a lot in that regard particularly in the Wawa-Zange grazing reserve which is 144 thousand hectares of land that is specifically made for animal husbandry”.

He said being an abandoned grazing reserve for so many years, the Wawa-Zange is gradually becoming a safe haven for renegades escaping onslaught of the Nigerian Armed Forces.

“There is need for us to put special attention to that, so I will like this meeting to devise some means by which you can give effective and efficient cover in terms of security, especially now that southern states have enacted laws proscribing open grazing”.

The Governor frowned at the inability of the laws proscribing open grazing in the southern part of the country to provide options for either ranching or colony for the herders.

Governor Inuwa Yahaya noted that as Nigerians, Government must provide the necessary environment for herders in order to enhance their business and to live happily and harmoniously with the entire people of the State.

“The State alone cannot do that, the Federal Government cannot do that, it takes the action of each and every one of us from the Federal Government to the State to the individuals that form this State for us to have a harmonious and peaceful co-existence and I hope this will form part of your consideration of this discussion of the middle level and Junior cadre military officers so that they have an alternative way by which we can protect the people”.

Governor Inuwa Yahaya assured the Nigerian Army and other security Agencies in the State that his administration will not develop a cold feet towards assisting their operations in the State.

Earlier in his address of welcome, the General Officer commanding 3 Armoured Division, Major General Isa Ali said the purpose of the training is to improve the professional efficiency and harmonise relationship between the Nigerian Army and other stakeholders in promoting internal security in 3rd Division Area of Responsibility, AOR.

The GOC maintained that the training week will equally afford officers to contribute to topical issues in line with the Chief of Army Staff’s vision which is “To have a professional Nigerian Army ready to accomplish assigned missions in defence of Nigeria”.

He said as a stakeholder in the development of the country, the Nigerian Army has the responsibility to profer solutions to the challenges confronting the nation, especially in the realm of security.

Major General Ali used the occasion to thank Governor Muhammadu Inuwa Yahaya for his continuous support to the Nigerian Army and sister agencies.

Ismaila Uba Misilli
Director-General
( Press Affairs)
Government House
Gombe

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